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THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE.

 

MORE AND MORE EXPERTS ARE COMING AROUND TO REVERSE MORTGAGES

 

The New Case for Reverse Mortgages

Wade D. Pfau

 

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Photo by STEVE HEAP

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on Nov. 30 2015

Wade D. PfauWade D. Pfau (@WadePfau) is a professor of retirement income in the Financial and Retirement Planning Ph.D. program at The American College and a principal at McLean Asset Management. He blogs on retirement research and maintains the Retirement Researcher website.

Reverse mortgages provide the ability to borrow a portion of your home equity without being required to repay the loan until the owner has permanently left it. The idea for reverse mortgages is that the value of your home is eventually used to repay your loan balance.

 

To the extent that there ever was much of a conversation about reverse mortgages as a retirement income tool, that conversation typically focused on either real or perceived negatives related to the traditionally high costs and potentially inappropriate uses for these funds. The assumption in financial and retirement planning was that reverse mortgages should only be considered as a last resort, once all other resources and possibilities had failed.

 

Well, a lot has changed in the past several years, and the result is that reverse mortgages have an undeserved bad reputation.

New Math on Reverse Mortgages

 

Advisers now are promoting them as a valuable tool for retirement planning, thanks to recent safeguards

Some financial advisers recommend that homeowners establish a line of credit using a federally insured reverse mortgage.

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on March 20, 2016

Photo: Andrei Tchernov/iStockphoto/Getty Imges

Article By: Robert Powell

Mr. Powell is the editor of Retirement Weekly, a service of MarketWatch.com. Email him at rob.powell@bbc.co.uk.

A decade ago, most financial advisers would roll their eyes at the mention of reverse mortgages, loans that give homeowners an advance on their home equity and allow them to delay repayment until the home is sold. Such products, these advisers used to say, weren’t for their clients, but rather for those who didn’t prepare financially for retirement.

 

New safeguards in recent years, however, have led many advisers and researchers to change their minds about reverse mortgages. Indeed, many now are exploring when and how to use them in financial plans.

Warning Signs That Your Parent’s Finances Are Off Track

 

This Article by June A. Schroeder, RN, CFP. was contributed by AgingCare.com.

 

June Schroeder is a Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) with Liberty Financial Group in Wisconsin

  June Schroeder

“I just can’t get this checkbook to balance this month.” Those words were my first inkling that mom might not be as sharp as she once was. I was taken by surprise. After all, she had managed her own finances with aplomb for many years and all I did was a little coaching. She remembered all her appointments, all her meds, and often reminded me of dates to remember. How did I miss this? Had I purposely been blind to subtle indicators? The answer was “yes,” because I didn’t want her to change.

 

 

 

 

Power of Attorney: Whom to Name and What Powers to Give

 

This article was contributed by AgingCare.com.

K. Gabriel Heiser is an attorney with over 25 years of experience in elder law and estate planning. He is the author of “How to Protect Your Family’s Assets from Devastating Nursing Home Costs: Medicaid Secrets,” an annually updated practical guide for the layperson.

It’s important to have a Durable Power of Attorney (POA) to assist with Medicaid planning and, even though it may seem easier or less expensive, there are definitely reasons to avoid buying a POA form online. However, even if you hire an attorney to prepare a POA form for you, there are still important decisions to be made and issues to be informed about.

THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE.

 

MORE AND MORE EXPERTS ARE COMING AROUND TO REVERSE MORTGAGES

The New Case for Reverse Mortgages

To the extent that there ever was much of a conversation about reverse mortgages as a retirement income tool, that conversation typically focused on either real or perceived negatives related to the traditionally high costs and potentially inappropriate uses for these funds. The assumption in financial and retirement planning was that reverse mortgages should only be considered as a last resort, once all other resources and possibilities had failed.

Wade D. Pfau

Photo by STEVE HEAP

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on Nov. 30 2015

Wade D. PfauWade D. Pfau (@WadePfau) is a professor of retirement income in the Financial and Retirement Planning Ph.D. program at The American College and a principal at McLean Asset Management. He blogs on retirement research and maintains the Retirement Researcher website.

Reverse mortgages provide the ability to borrow a portion of your home equity without being required to repay the loan until the owner has permanently left it. The idea for reverse mortgages is that the value of your home is eventually used to repay your loan balance.

 

Well, a lot has changed in the past several years, and the result is that reverse mortgages have an undeserved bad reputation.

New Math on Reverse Mortgages

 

Advisers now are promoting them as a valuable tool for retirement planning, thanks to recent safeguards

Some financial advisers recommend that homeowners establish a line of credit using a federally insured reverse mortgage.

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on March 20, 2016

Photo: Andrei Tchernov/iStockphoto/Getty Imges

Article By: Robert Powell

Mr. Powell is the editor of Retirement Weekly, a service of MarketWatch.com. Email him at rob.powell@bbc.co.uk.

A decade ago, most financial advisers would roll their eyes at the mention of reverse mortgages, loans that give homeowners an advance on their home equity and allow them to delay repayment until the home is sold. Such products, these advisers used to say, weren’t for their clients, but rather for those who didn’t prepare financially for retirement.

 

New safeguards in recent years, however, have led many advisers and researchers to change their minds about reverse mortgages. Indeed, many now are exploring when and how to use them in financial plans.

Warning Signs That Your Parent’s Finances Are Off Track

 

This Article by June A. Schroeder, RN, CFP. was contributed by AgingCare.com.

 

June Schroeder is a Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) with Liberty Financial Group in Wisconsin

  June Schroeder

 

“I just can’t get this checkbook to balance this month.” Those words were my first inkling that mom might not be as sharp as she once was. I was taken by surprise. After all, she had managed her own finances with aplomb for many years and all I did was a little coaching. She remembered all her appointments, all her meds, and often reminded me of dates to remember. How did I miss this? Had I purposely been blind to subtle indicators? The answer was “yes,” because I didn’t want her to change.

 

 

Power of Attorney: Whom to Name and What Powers to Give

 

This article was contributed by AgingCare.com.

K. Gabriel Heiser is an attorney with over 25 years of experience in elder law and estate planning. He is the author of “How to Protect Your Family’s Assets from Devastating Nursing Home Costs: Medicaid Secrets,” an annually updated practical guide for the layperson.

It’s important to have a Durable Power of Attorney (POA) to assist with Medicaid planning and, even though it may seem easier or less expensive, there are definitely reasons to avoid buying a POA form online. However, even if you hire an attorney to prepare a POA form for you, there are still important decisions to be made and issues to be informed about.

 Home

THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE.

 

MORE AND MORE EXPERTS ARE COMING AROUND TO REVERSE MORTGAGES

The New Case for Reverse Mortgages

To the extent that there ever was much of a conversation about reverse mortgages as a retirement income tool, that conversation typically focused on either real or perceived negatives related to the traditionally high costs and potentially inappropriate uses for these funds. The assumption in financial and retirement planning was that reverse mortgages should only be considered as a last resort, once all other resources and possibilities had failed.

Wade D. Pfau

Photo by STEVE HEAP

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on Nov. 30 2015

Wade D. PfauWade D. Pfau (@WadePfau) is a professor of retirement income in the Financial and Retirement Planning Ph.D. program at The American College and a principal at McLean Asset Management. He blogs on retirement research and maintains the Retirement Researcher website.

Reverse mortgages provide the ability to borrow a portion of your home equity without being required to repay the loan until the owner has permanently left it. The idea for reverse mortgages is that the value of your home is eventually used to repay your loan balance.

 

Well, a lot has changed in the past several years, and the result is that reverse mortgages have an undeserved bad reputation.

New Math on Reverse Mortgages

 

Advisers now are promoting them as a valuable tool for retirement planning, thanks to recent safeguards

Some financial advisers recommend that homeowners establish a line of credit using a federally insured reverse mortgage.

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on March 20, 2016

Photo: Andrei Tchernov/iStockphoto/Getty Imges

Article By: Robert Powell

Mr. Powell is the editor of Retirement Weekly, a service of MarketWatch.com. Email him at rob.powell@bbc.co.uk.

A decade ago, most financial advisers would roll their eyes at the mention of reverse mortgages, loans that give homeowners an advance on their home equity and allow them to delay repayment until the home is sold. Such products, these advisers used to say, weren’t for their clients, but rather for those who didn’t prepare financially for retirement.

 

New safeguards in recent years, however, have led many advisers and researchers to change their minds about reverse mortgages. Indeed, many now are exploring when and how to use them in financial plans.

Warning Signs That Your Parent’s Finances Are Off Track

 

This Article by June A. Schroeder, RN, CFP. was contributed by AgingCare.com.

 

June Schroeder is a Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) with Liberty Financial Group in Wisconsin

  June Schroeder

“I just can’t get this checkbook to balance this month.” Those words were my first inkling that mom might not be as sharp as she once was. I was taken by surprise. After all, she had managed her own finances with aplomb for many years and all I did was a little coaching. She remembered all her appointments, all her meds, and often reminded me of dates to remember. How did I miss this? Had I purposely been blind to subtle indicators? The answer was “yes,” because I didn’t want her to change.

 

 

Power of Attorney: Whom to Name and What Powers to Give

 

This article was contributed by AgingCare.com.

K. Gabriel Heiser is an attorney with over 25 years of experience in elder law and estate planning. He is the author of “How to Protect Your Family’s Assets from Devastating Nursing Home Costs: Medicaid Secrets,” an annually updated practical guide for the layperson.

It’s important to have a Durable Power of Attorney (POA) to assist with Medicaid planning and, even though it may seem easier or less expensive, there are definitely reasons to avoid buying a POA form online. However, even if you hire an attorney to prepare a POA form for you, there are still important decisions to be made and issues to be informed about.

MENU

THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE.

 

MORE AND MORE EXPERTS ARE COMING AROUND TO REVERSE MORTGAGES

The New Case for Reverse Mortgages

To the extent that there ever was much of a conversation about reverse mortgages as a retirement income tool, that conversation typically focused on either real or perceived negatives related to the traditionally high costs and potentially inappropriate uses for these funds. The assumption in financial and retirement planning was that reverse mortgages should only be considered as a last resort, once all other resources and possibilities had failed.

Wade D. Pfau

Photo by STEVE HEAP

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on Nov. 30 2015

Photo by STEVE HEAP

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on Nov. 30 2015

Wade D. PfauWade D. Pfau (@WadePfau) is a professor of retirement income in the Financial and Retirement Planning Ph.D. program at The American College and a principal at McLean Asset Management. He blogs on retirement research and maintains the Retirement Researcher website.

Wade D. PfauWade D. Pfau (@WadePfau) is a professor of retirement income in the Financial and Retirement Planning Ph.D. program at The American College and a principal at McLean Asset Management. He blogs on retirement research and maintains the Retirement Researcher website.

Reverse mortgages provide the ability to borrow a portion of your home equity without being required to repay the loan until the owner has permanently left it. The idea for reverse mortgages is that the value of your home is eventually used to repay your loan balance.

 

Well, a lot has changed in the past several years, and the result is that reverse mortgages have an undeserved bad reputation.

New Math on Reverse Mortgages

 

Advisers now are promoting them as a valuable tool for retirement planning, thanks to recent safeguards

Some financial advisers recommend that homeowners establish a line of credit using a federally insured reverse mortgage.

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on March 20, 2016

Photo: Andrei Tchernov/iStockphoto/Getty Imges

Article By: Robert Powell

Mr. Powell is the editor of Retirement Weekly, a service of MarketWatch.com. Email him at rob.powell@bbc.co.uk.

A decade ago, most financial advisers would roll their eyes at the mention of reverse mortgages, loans that give homeowners an advance on their home equity and allow them to delay repayment until the home is sold. Such products, these advisers used to say, weren’t for their clients, but rather for those who didn’t prepare financially for retirement.

 

New safeguards in recent years, however, have led many advisers and researchers to change their minds about reverse mortgages. Indeed, many now are exploring when and how to use them in financial plans.

Warning Signs That Your Parent’s Finances Are Off Track

 

This Article by June A. Schroeder, RN, CFP. was contributed by AgingCare.com.

 

June Schroeder is a Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) with Liberty Financial Group in Wisconsin

  June Schroeder

“I just can’t get this checkbook to balance this month.” Those words were my first inkling that mom might not be as sharp as she once was. I was taken by surprise. After all, she had managed her own finances with aplomb for many years and all I did was a little coaching. She remembered all her appointments, all her meds, and often reminded me of dates to remember. How did I miss this? Had I purposely been blind to subtle indicators? The answer was “yes,” because I didn’t want her to change.

 

 

Power of Attorney: Whom to Name and What Powers to Give

 

This article was contributed by AgingCare.com.

K. Gabriel Heiser is an attorney with over 25 years of experience in elder law and estate planning. He is the author of “How to Protect Your Family’s Assets from Devastating Nursing Home Costs: Medicaid Secrets,” an annually updated practical guide for the layperson.

It’s important to have a Durable Power of Attorney (POA) to assist with Medicaid planning and, even though it may seem easier or less expensive, there are definitely reasons to avoid buying a POA form online. However, even if you hire an attorney to prepare a POA form for you, there are still important decisions to be made and issues to be informed about.

 Home

THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE.

 

MORE AND MORE EXPERTS ARE COMING AROUND TO REVERSE MORTGAGES

The New Case for Reverse Mortgages

To the extent that there ever was much of a conversation about reverse mortgages as a retirement income tool, that conversation typically focused on either real or perceived negatives related to the traditionally high costs and potentially inappropriate uses for these funds. The assumption in financial and retirement planning was that reverse mortgages should only be considered as a last resort, once all other resources and possibilities had failed.

Wade D. Pfau

Photo by STEVE HEAP

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on Nov. 30 2015

Wade D. PfauWade D. Pfau (@WadePfau) is a professor of retirement income in the Financial and Retirement Planning Ph.D. program at The American College and a principal at McLean Asset Management. He blogs on retirement research and maintains the Retirement Researcher website.

Reverse mortgages provide the ability to borrow a portion of your home equity without being required to repay the loan until the owner has permanently left it. The idea for reverse mortgages is that the value of your home is eventually used to repay your loan balance.

 

Well, a lot has changed in the past several years, and the result is that reverse mortgages have an undeserved bad reputation.

New Math on Reverse Mortgages

 

Advisers now are promoting them as a valuable tool for retirement planning, thanks to recent safeguards

Some financial advisers recommend that homeowners establish a line of credit using a federally insured reverse mortgage.

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on March 20, 2016

Photo: Andrei Tchernov/iStockphoto/Getty Imges

Article By: Robert Powell

Mr. Powell is the editor of Retirement Weekly, a service of MarketWatch.com. Email him at rob.powell@bbc.co.uk.

A decade ago, most financial advisers would roll their eyes at the mention of reverse mortgages, loans that give homeowners an advance on their home equity and allow them to delay repayment until the home is sold. Such products, these advisers used to say, weren’t for their clients, but rather for those who didn’t prepare financially for retirement.

 

New safeguards in recent years, however, have led many advisers and researchers to change their minds about reverse mortgages. Indeed, many now are exploring when and how to use them in financial plans.

Warning Signs That Your Parent’s Finances Are Off Track

 

This Article by June A. Schroeder, RN, CFP. was contributed by AgingCare.com.

 

June Schroeder is a Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) with Liberty Financial Group in Wisconsin

  June Schroeder

“I just can’t get this checkbook to balance this month.” Those words were my first inkling that mom might not be as sharp as she once was. I was taken by surprise. After all, she had managed her own finances with aplomb for many years and all I did was a little coaching. She remembered all her appointments, all her meds, and often reminded me of dates to remember. How did I miss this? Had I purposely been blind to subtle indicators? The answer was “yes,” because I didn’t want her to change.

 

 

Power of Attorney: Whom to Name and What Powers to Give

 

This article was contributed by AgingCare.com.

K. Gabriel Heiser is an attorney with over 25 years of experience in elder law and estate planning. He is the author of “How to Protect Your Family’s Assets from Devastating Nursing Home Costs: Medicaid Secrets,” an annually updated practical guide for the layperson.

It’s important to have a Durable Power of Attorney (POA) to assist with Medicaid planning and, even though it may seem easier or less expensive, there are definitely reasons to avoid buying a POA form online. However, even if you hire an attorney to prepare a POA form for you, there are still important decisions to be made and issues to be informed about.

Home

THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE.

 

MORE AND MORE EXPERTS ARE COMING AROUND TO REVERSE MORTGAGES

The New Case for Reverse Mortgages

To the extent that there ever was much of a conversation about reverse mortgages as a retirement income tool, that conversation typically focused on either real or perceived negatives related to the traditionally high costs and potentially inappropriate uses for these funds. The assumption in financial and retirement planning was that reverse mortgages should only be considered as a last resort, once all other resources and possibilities had failed.

Wade D. Pfau

Photo by STEVE HEAP

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on Nov. 30 2015

Wade D. PfauWade D. Pfau (@WadePfau) is a professor of retirement income in the Financial and Retirement Planning Ph.D. program at The American College and a principal at McLean Asset Management. He blogs on retirement research and maintains the Retirement Researcher website.

Reverse mortgages provide the ability to borrow a portion of your home equity without being required to repay the loan until the owner has permanently left it. The idea for reverse mortgages is that the value of your home is eventually used to repay your loan balance.

 

Well, a lot has changed in the past several years, and the result is that reverse mortgages have an undeserved bad reputation.

New Math on Reverse Mortgages

 

Advisers now are promoting them as a valuable tool for retirement planning, thanks to recent safeguards

Some financial advisers recommend that homeowners establish a line of credit using a federally insured reverse mortgage.

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on March 20, 2016

Photo: Andrei Tchernov/iStockphoto/Getty Imges

Article By: Robert Powell

Mr. Powell is the editor of Retirement Weekly, a service of MarketWatch.com. Email him at rob.powell@bbc.co.uk.

A decade ago, most financial advisers would roll their eyes at the mention of reverse mortgages, loans that give homeowners an advance on their home equity and allow them to delay repayment until the home is sold. Such products, these advisers used to say, weren’t for their clients, but rather for those who didn’t prepare financially for retirement.

 

New safeguards in recent years, however, have led many advisers and researchers to change their minds about reverse mortgages. Indeed, many now are exploring when and how to use them in financial plans.

Warning Signs That Your Parent’s Finances Are Off Track

 

This Article by June A. Schroeder, RN, CFP. was contributed by AgingCare.com.

 

June Schroeder is a Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) with Liberty Financial Group in Wisconsin

  June Schroeder

“I just can’t get this checkbook to balance this month.” Those words were my first inkling that mom might not be as sharp as she once was. I was taken by surprise. After all, she had managed her own finances with aplomb for many years and all I did was a little coaching. She remembered all her appointments, all her meds, and often reminded me of dates to remember. How did I miss this? Had I purposely been blind to subtle indicators? The answer was “yes,” because I didn’t want her to change.

 

 

Power of Attorney: Whom to Name and What Powers to Give

 

This article was contributed by AgingCare.com.

K. Gabriel Heiser is an attorney with over 25 years of experience in elder law and estate planning. He is the author of “How to Protect Your Family’s Assets from Devastating Nursing Home Costs: Medicaid Secrets,” an annually updated practical guide for the layperson.

It’s important to have a Durable Power of Attorney (POA) to assist with Medicaid planning and, even though it may seem easier or less expensive, there are definitely reasons to avoid buying a POA form online. However, even if you hire an attorney to prepare a POA form for you, there are still important decisions to be made and issues to be informed about.

Home

THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE.

 

MORE AND MORE EXPERTS ARE COMING AROUND TO REVERSE MORTGAGES

The New Case for Reverse Mortgages

To the extent that there ever was much of a conversation about reverse mortgages as a retirement income tool, that conversation typically focused on either real or perceived negatives related to the traditionally high costs and potentially inappropriate uses for these funds. The assumption in financial and retirement planning was that reverse mortgages should only be considered as a last resort, once all other resources and possibilities had failed.

Wade D. Pfau

Photo by STEVE HEAP

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on Nov. 30 2015

Wade D. PfauWade D. Pfau (@WadePfau) is a professor of retirement income in the Financial and Retirement Planning Ph.D. program at The American College and a principal at McLean Asset Management. He blogs on retirement research and maintains the Retirement Researcher website.

Reverse mortgages provide the ability to borrow a portion of your home equity without being required to repay the loan until the owner has permanently left it. The idea for reverse mortgages is that the value of your home is eventually used to repay your loan balance.

 

Well, a lot has changed in the past several years, and the result is that reverse mortgages have an undeserved bad reputation.

New Math on Reverse Mortgages

 

Advisers now are promoting them as a valuable tool for retirement planning,

thanks to recent safeguards

Some financial advisers recommend that homeowners establish a line of credit using a federally insured reverse mortgage.

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on March 20, 2016

Photo: Andrei Tchernov/iStockphoto/Getty Imges

Article By: Robert Powell

Mr. Powell is the editor of Retirement Weekly, a service of MarketWatch.com. Email him at rob.powell@bbc.co.uk.

A decade ago, most financial advisers would roll their eyes at the mention of reverse mortgages, loans that give homeowners an advance on their home equity and allow them to delay repayment until the home is sold. Such products, these advisers used to say, weren’t for their clients, but rather for those who didn’t prepare financially for retirement.

 

New safeguards in recent years, however, have led many advisers and researchers to change their minds about reverse mortgages. Indeed, many now are exploring when and how to use them in financial plans.

Warning Signs That Your Parent’s Finances Are Off Track

 

This Article by June A. Schroeder, RN, CFP. was contributed by AgingCare.com.

 

June Schroeder is a Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) with Liberty Financial Group in Wisconsin

  June Schroeder

 

“I just can’t get this checkbook to balance this month.” Those words were my first inkling that mom might not be as sharp as she once was. I was taken by surprise. After all, she had managed her own finances with aplomb for many years and all I did was a little coaching. She remembered all her appointments, all her meds, and often reminded me of dates to remember. How did I miss this? Had I purposely been blind to subtle indicators? The answer was “yes,” because I didn’t want her to change.

 

 

Power of Attorney: Whom to Name and What Powers to Give

 

This article was contributed by AgingCare.com.

K. Gabriel Heiser is an attorney with over 25 years of experience in elder law and estate planning. He is the author of “How to Protect Your Family’s Assets from Devastating Nursing Home Costs: Medicaid Secrets,” an annually updated practical guide for the layperson.

It’s important to have a Durable Power of Attorney (POA) to assist with Medicaid planning and, even though it may seem easier or less expensive, there are definitely reasons to avoid buying a POA form online. However, even if you hire an attorney to prepare a POA form for you, there are still important decisions to be made and issues to be informed about.

Home

THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE.

 

MORE AND MORE EXPERTS ARE COMING AROUND TO REVERSE MORTGAGES

The New Case for Reverse Mortgages

To the extent that there ever was much of a conversation about reverse mortgages as a retirement income tool, that conversation typically focused on either real or perceived negatives related to the traditionally high costs and potentially inappropriate uses for these funds. The assumption in financial and retirement planning was that reverse mortgages should only be considered as a last resort, once all other resources and possibilities had failed.

Wade D. Pfau

Photo by STEVE HEAP

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on Nov. 30 2015

Wade D. PfauWade D. Pfau (@WadePfau) is a professor of retirement income in the Financial and Retirement Planning Ph.D. program at The American College and a principal at McLean Asset Management. He blogs on retirement research and maintains the Retirement Researcher website.

Reverse mortgages provide the ability to borrow a portion of your home equity without being required to repay the loan until the owner has permanently left it. The idea for reverse mortgages is that the value of your home is eventually used to repay your loan balance.

 

Well, a lot has changed in the past several years, and the result is that reverse mortgages have an undeserved bad reputation.

New Math on Reverse Mortgages

 

Advisers now are promoting them as a valuable tool for retirement planning, thanks to recent safeguards

Some financial advisers recommend that homeowners establish a line of credit using a federally insured reverse mortgage.

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on March 20, 2016

Photo: Andrei Tchernov/iStockphoto/Getty Imges

Article By: Robert Powell

Mr. Powell is the editor of Retirement Weekly, a service of MarketWatch.com. Email him at rob.powell@bbc.co.uk.

A decade ago, most financial advisers would roll their eyes at the mention of reverse mortgages, loans that give homeowners an advance on their home equity and allow them to delay repayment until the home is sold. Such products, these advisers used to say, weren’t for their clients, but rather for those who didn’t prepare financially for retirement.

 

New safeguards in recent years, however, have led many advisers and researchers to change their minds about reverse mortgages. Indeed, many now are exploring when and how to use them in financial plans.

Warning Signs That Your Parent’s Finances Are Off Track

 

This Article by June A. Schroeder, RN, CFP. was contributed by AgingCare.com.

 

June Schroeder is a Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) with Liberty Financial Group in Wisconsin

  June Schroeder

 

“I just can’t get this checkbook to balance this month.” Those words were my first inkling that mom might not be as sharp as she once was. I was taken by surprise. After all, she had managed her own finances with aplomb for many years and all I did was a little coaching. She remembered all her appointments, all her meds, and often reminded me of dates to remember. How did I miss this? Had I purposely been blind to subtle indicators? The answer was “yes,” because I didn’t want her to change.

 

 

Power of Attorney: Whom to Name and What Powers to Give

 

This article was contributed by AgingCare.com.

K. Gabriel Heiser is an attorney with over 25 years of experience in elder law and estate planning. He is the author of “How to Protect Your Family’s Assets from Devastating Nursing Home Costs: Medicaid Secrets,” an annually updated practical guide for the layperson.

It’s important to have a Durable Power of Attorney (POA) to assist with Medicaid planning and, even though it may seem easier or less expensive, there are definitely reasons to avoid buying a POA form online. However, even if you hire an attorney to prepare a POA form for you, there are still important decisions to be made and issues to be informed about.

Home

THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE.

 

MORE AND MORE EXPERTS ARE COMING AROUND TO REVERSE MORTGAGES

The New Case for Reverse Mortgages

To the extent that there ever was much of a conversation about reverse mortgages as a retirement income tool, that conversation typically focused on either real or perceived negatives related to the traditionally high costs and potentially inappropriate uses for these funds. The assumption in financial and retirement planning was that reverse mortgages should only be considered as a last resort, once all other resources and possibilities had failed.

Wade D. Pfau

Photo by STEVE HEAP

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on Nov. 30 2015

Wade D. PfauWade D. Pfau (@WadePfau) is a professor of retirement income in the Financial and Retirement Planning Ph.D. program at The American College and a principal at McLean Asset Management. He blogs on retirement research and maintains the Retirement Researcher website.

Reverse mortgages provide the ability to borrow a portion of your home equity without being required to repay the loan until the owner has permanently left it. The idea for reverse mortgages is that the value of your home is eventually used to repay your loan balance.

 

Well, a lot has changed in the past several years, and the result is that reverse mortgages have an undeserved bad reputation.

New Math on Reverse Mortgages

 

Advisers now are promoting them as a valuable tool for retirement planning, thanks to recent safeguards

Some financial advisers recommend that homeowners establish a line of credit using a federally insured reverse mortgage.

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on March 20, 2016

Photo: Andrei Tchernov/iStockphoto/Getty Imges

Article By: Robert Powell

Mr. Powell is the editor of Retirement Weekly, a service of MarketWatch.com. Email him at rob.powell@bbc.co.uk.

A decade ago, most financial advisers would roll their eyes at the mention of reverse mortgages, loans that give homeowners an advance on their home equity and allow them to delay repayment until the home is sold. Such products, these advisers used to sa`y, weren’t for their clients, but rather for those who didn’t prepare financially for retirement.

 

New safeguards in recent years, however, have led many advisers and researchers to change their minds about reverse mortgages. Indeed, many now are exploring when and how to use them in financial plans.

Warning Signs That Your Parent’s Finances Are Off Track

 

This Article by June A. Schroeder, RN, CFP. was contributed by AgingCare.com.

 

June Schroeder is a Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) with Liberty Financial Group in Wisconsin

  June Schroeder

“I just can’t get this checkbook to balance this month.” Those words were my first inkling that mom might not be as sharp as she once was. I was taken by surprise. After all, she had managed her own finances with aplomb for many years and all I did was a little coaching. She remembered all her appointments, all her meds, and often reminded me of dates to remember. How did I miss this? Had I purposely been blind to subtle indicators? The answer was “yes,” because I didn’t want her to change.

 

 

Power of Attorney: Whom to Name and What Powers to Give

 

This article was contributed by AgingCare.com.

K. Gabriel Heiser is an attorney with over 25 years of experience in elder law and estate planning. He is the author of “How to Protect Your Family’s Assets from Devastating Nursing Home Costs: Medicaid Secrets,” an annually updated practical guide for the layperson.

It’s important to have a Durable Power of Attorney (POA) to assist with Medicaid planning and, even though it may seem easier or less expensive, there are definitely reasons to avoid buying a POA form online. However, even if you hire an attorney to prepare a POA form for you, there are still important decisions to be made and issues to be informed about.

Home

THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE.

 

MORE AND MORE EXPERTS ARE COMING AROUND TO REVERSE MORTGAGES

The New Case for Reverse Mortgages

To the extent that there ever was much of a conversation about reverse mortgages as a retirement income tool, that conversation typically focused on either real or perceived negatives related to the traditionally high costs and potentially inappropriate uses for these funds. The assumption in financial and retirement planning was that reverse mortgages should only be considered as a last resort, once all other resources and possibilities had failed.

Wade D. Pfau

Photo by STEVE HEAP

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on Nov. 30 2015

Wade D. PfauWade D. Pfau (@WadePfau) is a professor of retirement income in the Financial and Retirement Planning Ph.D. program at The American College and a principal at McLean Asset Management. He blogs on retirement research and maintains the Retirement Researcher website.

Reverse mortgages provide the ability to borrow a portion of your home equity without being required to repay the loan until the owner has permanently left it. The idea for reverse mortgages is that the value of your home is eventually used to repay your loan balance.

 

Well, a lot has changed in the past several years, and the result is that reverse mortgages have an undeserved bad reputation.

New Math on Reverse Mortgages

 

Advisers now are promoting them as a valuable tool for retirement planning, thanks to recent safeguards

Some financial advisers recommend that homeowners establish a line of credit using a federally insured reverse mortgage.

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on March 20, 2016

Photo: Andrei Tchernov/iStockphoto/Getty Imges

Article By: Robert Powell

Mr. Powell is the editor of Retirement Weekly, a service of MarketWatch.com. Email him at rob.powell@bbc.co.uk.

A decade ago, most financial advisers would roll their eyes at the mention of reverse mortgages, loans that give homeowners an advance on their home equity and allow them to delay repayment until the home is sold. Such products, these advisers used to say, weren’t for their clients, but rather for those who didn’t prepare financially for retirement.

 

New safeguards in recent years, however, have led many advisers and researchers to change their minds about reverse mortgages. Indeed, many now are exploring when and how to use them in financial plans.

Warning Signs That Your Parent’s Finances Are Off Track

 

This Article by June A. Schroeder, RN, CFP. was contributed by AgingCare.com.

 

June Schroeder is a Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) with Liberty Financial Group in Wisconsin

  June Schroeder

“I just can’t get this checkbook to balance this month.” Those words were my first inkling that mom might not be as sharp as she once was. I was taken by surprise. After all, she had managed her own finances with aplomb for many years and all I did was a little coaching. She remembered all her appointments, all her meds, and often reminded me of dates to remember. How did I miss this? Had I purposely been blind to subtle indicators? The answer was “yes,” because I didn’t want her to change.

 

 

Power of Attorney: Whom to Name and What Powers to Give

 

This article was contributed by AgingCare.com.

K. Gabriel Heiser is an attorney with over 25 years of experience in elder law and estate planning. He is the author of “How to Protect Your Family’s Assets from Devastating Nursing Home Costs: Medicaid Secrets,” an annually updated practical guide for the layperson.

It’s important to have a Durable Power of Attorney (POA) to assist with Medicaid planning and, even though it may seem easier or less expensive, there are definitely reasons to avoid buying a POA form online. However, even if you hire an attorney to prepare a POA form for you, there are still important decisions to be made and issues to be informed about.

Home

THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE.

 

MORE AND MORE EXPERTS ARE COMING

 AROUND TO REVERSE MORTGAGES

The New Case for Reverse Mortgages

To the extent that there ever was much of a conversation about reverse mortgages as a retirement income tool, that conversation typically focused on either real or perceived negatives related to the traditionally high costs and potentially inappropriate uses for these funds. The assumption in financial and retirement planning was that reverse mortgages should only be considered as a last resort, once all other resources and possibilities had failed.

Wade D. Pfau

Photo by STEVE HEAP

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on Nov. 30 2015

Wade D. PfauWade D. Pfau (@WadePfau) is a professor of retirement income in the Financial and Retirement Planning Ph.D. program at The American College and a principal at McLean Asset Management. He blogs on retirement research and maintains the Retirement Researcher website.

Reverse mortgages provide the ability to borrow a portion of your home equity without being required to repay the loan until the owner has permanently left it. The idea for reverse mortgages is that the value of your home is eventually used to repay your loan balance.

Well, a lot has changed in the past several years, and the result is that reverse mortgages have an undeserved bad reputation.

New Math on Reverse Mortgages

 

Advisers now are promoting them as a valuable tool for retirement planning, thanks to recent safeguards

Some financial advisers recommend that homeowners establish a line of credit using a federally insured reverse mortgage.

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on March 20, 2016

Photo: Andrei Tchernov/iStockphoto/Getty Imges

Article By: Robert Powell

Mr. Powell is the editor of Retirement Weekly, a service of MarketWatch.com. Email him at rob.powell@bbc.co.uk.

A decade ago, most financial advisers would roll their eyes at the mention of reverse mortgages, loans that give homeowners an advance on their home equity and allow them to delay repayment until the home is sold. Such products, these advisers used to say, weren’t for their clients, but rather for those who didn’t prepare financially for retirement.

 

New safeguards in recent years, however, have led many advisers and researchers to change their minds about reverse mortgages. Indeed, many now are exploring when and how to use them in financial plans.

Warning Signs That Your Parent’s Finances Are Off Track

 

This Article by June A. Schroeder, RN, CFP. was contributed by AgingCare.com.

 

June Schroeder is a Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) with Liberty Financial Group in Wisconsin

  June Schroeder

“I just can’t get this checkbook to balance this month.” Those words were my first inkling that mom might not be as sharp as she once was. I was taken by surprise. After all, she had managed her own finances with aplomb for many years and all I did was a little coaching. She remembered all her appointments, all her meds, and often reminded me of dates to remember. How did I miss this? Had I purposely been blind to subtle indicators? The answer was “yes,” because I didn’t want her to change.

 

 

Power of Attorney: Whom to Name and What Powers to Give

 

This article was contributed by AgingCare.com.

K. Gabriel Heiser is an attorney with over 25 years of experience in elder law and estate planning. He is the author of “How to Protect Your Family’s Assets from Devastating Nursing Home Costs: Medicaid Secrets,” an annually updated practical guide for the layperson.

It’s important to have a Durable Power of Attorney (POA) to assist with Medicaid planning and, even though it may seem easier or less expensive, there are definitely reasons to avoid buying a POA form online. However, even if you hire an attorney to prepare a POA form for you, there are still important decisions to be made and issues to be informed about.

 Home

THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE.

 

MORE AND MORE EXPERTS ARE COMING

 AROUND TO REVERSE MORTGAGES

The New Case for Reverse Mortgages

To the extent that there ever was much of a conversation about reverse mortgages as a retirement income tool, that conversation typically focused on either real or perceived negatives related to the traditionally high costs and potentially inappropriate uses for these funds. The assumption in financial and retirement planning was that reverse mortgages should only be considered as a last resort, once all other resources and possibilities had failed.

Wade D. Pfau

Photo by STEVE HEAP

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on Nov. 30 2015

Wade D. PfauWade D. Pfau (@WadePfau) is a professor of retirement income in the Financial and Retirement Planning Ph.D. program at The American College and a principal at McLean Asset Management. He blogs on retirement research and maintains the Retirement Researcher website.

Reverse mortgages provide the ability to borrow a portion of your home equity without being required to repay the loan until the owner has permanently left it. The idea for reverse mortgages is that the value of your home is eventually used to repay your loan balance.

Well, a lot has changed in the past several years, and the result is that reverse mortgages have an undeserved bad reputation.

New Math on Reverse Mortgages

 

Advisers now are promoting them as a valuable tool for retirement planning, thanks to recent safeguards

Some financial advisers recommend that homeowners establish a line of credit using a federally insured reverse mortgage.

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on March 20, 2016

Photo: Andrei Tchernov/iStockphoto/Getty Imges

Article By: Robert Powell

Mr. Powell is the editor of Retirement Weekly, a service of MarketWatch.com. Email him at rob.powell@bbc.co.uk.

A decade ago, most financial advisers would roll their eyes at the mention of reverse mortgages, loans that give homeowners an advance on their home equity and allow them to delay repayment until the home is sold. Such products, these advisers used to say, weren’t for their clients, but rather for those who didn’t prepare financially for retirement.

 

New safeguards in recent years, however, have led many advisers and researchers to change their minds about reverse mortgages. Indeed, many now are exploring when and how to use them in financial plans.

Warning Signs That Your Parent’s Finances Are Off Track

 

This Article by June A. Schroeder, RN, CFP. was contributed by AgingCare.com.

 

June Schroeder is a Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) with Liberty Financial Group in Wisconsin

  June Schroeder

Power of Attorney: Whom to Name and What Powers to Give

 

This article was contributed by AgingCare.com.

K. Gabriel Heiser is an attorney with over 25 years of experience in elder law and estate planning. He is the author of “How to Protect Your Family’s Assets from Devastating Nursing Home Costs: Medicaid Secrets,” an annually updated practical guide for the layperson.

It’s important to have a Durable Power of Attorney (POA) to assist with Medicaid planning and, even though it may seem easier or less expensive, there are definitely reasons to avoid buying a POA form online. However, even if you hire an attorney to prepare a POA form for you, there are still important decisions to be made and issues to be informed about.

Home

THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE.

 

MORE AND MORE EXPERTS ARE COMING

 AROUND TO REVERSE MORTGAGES

The New Case for Reverse Mortgages

To the extent that there ever was much of a conversation about reverse mortgages as a retirement income tool, that conversation typically focused on either real or perceived negatives related to the traditionally high costs and potentially inappropriate uses for these funds. The assumption in financial and retirement planning was that reverse mortgages should only be considered as a last resort, once all other resources and possibilities had failed.

Wade D. Pfau

Photo by STEVE HEAP

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on Nov. 30 2015

Wade D. Pfau (@WadePfau) is a professor of retirement income in the Financial and Retirement Planning Ph.D. program at The American College and a principal at McLean Asset Management. He blogs on retirement research and maintains the Retirement Researcher website.

Reverse mortgages provide the ability to borrow a portion of your home equity without being required to repay the loan until the owner has permanently left it. The idea for reverse mortgages is that the value of your home is eventually used to repay your loan balance.

Well, a lot has changed in the past several years, and the result is that reverse mortgages have an undeserved bad reputation.

New Math on Reverse Mortgages

 

Advisers now are promoting them as a valuable tool for retirement planning, thanks to recent safeguards

Some financial advisers recommend that homeowners establish a line of credit using a federally insured reverse mortgage.

This article, along with the photo, appeared in the Wall Street Journal “The Experts Blog” on March 20, 2016

Photo: Andrei Tchernov/iStockphoto/Getty Imges

Article By: Robert Powell

Mr. Powell is the editor of Retirement Weekly, a service of MarketWatch.com. Email him at rob.powell@bbc.co.uk.

A decade ago, most financial advisers would roll their eyes at the mention of reverse mortgages, loans that give homeowners an advance on their home equity and allow them to delay repayment until the home is sold. Such products, these advisers used to say, weren’t for their clients, but rather for those who didn’t prepare financially for retirement.

 

New safeguards in recent years, however, have led many advisers and researchers to change their minds about reverse mortgages. Indeed, many now are exploring when and how to use them in financial plans.

Warning Signs That Your Parent’s Finances Are Off Track

 

This Article by June A. Schroeder, RN, CFP. was contributed by AgingCare.com.

 

June Schroeder is a Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) with Liberty Financial Group in Wisconsin

  June Schroeder

“I just can’t get this checkbook to balance this month.” Those words were my first inkling that mom might not be as sharp as she once was. I was taken by surprise. After all, she had managed her own finances with aplomb for many years and all I did was a little coaching. She remembered all her appointments, all her meds, and often reminded me of dates to remember. How did I miss this? Had I purposely been blind to subtle indicators? The answer was “yes,” because I didn’t want her to change.

 

 

Power of Attorney: Whom to Name and What Powers to Give

 

This article was contributed by AgingCare.com.

K. Gabriel Heiser is an attorney with over 25 years of experience in elder law and estate planning. He is the author of “How to Protect Your Family’s Assets from Devastating Nursing Home Costs: Medicaid Secrets,” an annually updated practical guide for the layperson.

It’s important to have a Durable Power of Attorney (POA) to assist with Medicaid planning and, even though it may seem easier or less expensive, there are definitely reasons to avoid buying a POA form online. However, even if you hire an attorney to prepare a POA form for you, there are still important decisions to be made and issues to be informed about.